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Offered full-time position, signed contract, offer pulled

I have been out of work for nearly a year, and as such have looked for pretty much any job. I recently was put in touch with a security/concierge company through a friend, interviewed, and was offered a full-time job as a hotel concierge.

The employer had me fill out paperwork, which included a contract detailing my work location, schedule, and hourly wage, which I signed. (I do not have a copy of this, however. I know, dumb.) I also filled out standard paperwork, such as acknowledgment of the non-discrimination policy, sexual harassment policy, direct deposit forms, etc. as well as an agreement to deduct a portion of the cost of my uniform from each paycheck.

I was to begin training earlier this week, but was called by the new employer, asking me to postpone training for a couple of days while they finish the process of dismissing my predecessor. After not hearing anything for several days, I called this morning, and was told that the employer decided it did not have enough cause to fire the predecessor, and as such can no longer offer me that position. They have offered me a part-time position at another hotel, at a lower hourly wage.

I guess my question is to whether the employer is bound to fulfilling its end of the contract regarding my work location, schedule, and hourly wage? If so, what can I do about it?

Thanks for all your help.

 
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breached employment contract

If you had a contract for employment you can attempt to enforce that contract.  The contract itself can be obtained through discovery.  However, there is no way I can offer a even a guess about your situation without reviewing all of the documents related to your hiring.  You need to contact a MA employment law attorney and ask her to review the documents you do have, listen to your explanation of what happened, and let you know if it is worth your time and money to proceed with some type of action or, perhaps, just a strongly worded letter.  Good luck.

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